Once you have found your voice and identified what you need, you must verbalize those needs to start to use it.

What that means is different for each person. Maybe, for you, it means speaking up at your next oncology appointment about a symptom you were embarrassed to discuss. Maybe it means pushing back when you feel invalidated or unheard.

While doctors may know about your cancer, you are the expert of your own experience. By sharing your story, you are providing a valuable resource to others in a similar situation. We accept written and video submissions for our blog and Tell Your Story Program.

Your experience during and after treatment is also extremely valuable in the formation of new treatments. Consider lending your voice to patient experience research like The GRYT Project. Not only will you have the opportunity to be heard, but you will be helping to improve quality of life and health outcomes for others.

Discover resources here to navigate what it means to use your voice and how by doing so, you can make a difference for yourself and others.

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How Can You Help When a Family Member is Diagnosed?

When we talk about cancer in families, the focus understandably tends to fall on the affected patient. As anyone who has dealt with this situation understands though, this kind of diagnosis is very difficult for the rest of the family as well.


Marcy M.

The Good Cancer

I am Marcy from Buffalo, NY. I'm about to be 30, and 6 months ago, during this coronavirus pandemic I started a new journey called thyroid cancer.


The Future of Cancer Treatment From the Patient Perspective

Over the last 15 years, the cancer community has witnessed a revolution in cancer treatment. New understanding of the immune system’s role in fighting cancer, as well as the genetics of cancer, have led to the development of new immunotherapies and targeted therapies that have improved survivorship and changed...