Once you have found your voice and identified what you need, you must verbalize those needs to start to use it.

What that means is different for each person. Maybe, for you, it means speaking up at your next oncology appointment about a symptom you were embarrassed to discuss. Maybe it means pushing back when you feel invalidated or unheard.

While doctors may know about your cancer, you are the expert of your own experience. By sharing your story, you are providing a valuable resource to others in a similar situation. We accept written and video submissions for our blog and Tell Your Story Program.

Your experience during and after treatment is also extremely valuable in the formation of new treatments. Consider lending your voice to patient experience research like The GRYT Project. Not only will you have the opportunity to be heard, but you will be helping to improve quality of life and health outcomes for others.

Discover resources here to navigate what it means to use your voice and how by doing so, you can make a difference for yourself and others.

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Emotional Wellbeing and Resilience in the Face of Cancer

Getting through cancer is messy. After your scars heal, how do you even start to put yourself back together emotionally? A relationship with the unexpected, cancer can cause...


Unsplash

How Can You Help When a Family Member is Diagnosed?

When we talk about cancer in families, the focus understandably tends to fall on the affected patient. As anyone who has dealt with this situation understands though, this kind of diagnosis is very difficult for the rest of the family as well.


Marcy M.

The Good Cancer

I am Marcy from Buffalo, NY. I'm about to be 30, and 6 months ago, during this coronavirus pandemic I started a new journey called thyroid cancer.


Therapeutic Yoga For Cancer

Enjoy some downtime in a mellow 45 minute therapeutic yoga for cancer support session. Join Tara (RTY500) from Lov Yoga (www.lov.yoga), as she teaches a yoga class for all levels of experience. Modifications will be offered so all can participate. You can transition to a nice long savasana at any time as well!


Justin B.

Depression–A Cancer Survivor’s Story

I’ve alluded to this in past writings, but I fought with clinical depression during high school. However, I’ve never written a full account of this trying time, and in the wake of the unfortunate events with Anthony Bourdain, Kate Spade, and countless others throughout the past decade, I’m ready to take that leap in hopes of letting someone else know to ask for help.


Rachel M.

Cancer Isn't Just Cancer

The truth is, I’m really struggling. Struggling with school, struggling with my mental health, struggling with making sense of everything I’ve gone through. Because it isn’t fair. It will never be fair that I got cancer, and it will never be fair that anyone gets cancer.


Nichole O.

How to Identify What You Need

So now, instead of pushing to get back to normal, I try and take a few minutes at some point during the day to recognize how I’m feeling, acknowledge it and either address it or let it go. Sometimes simply recognizing your feelings is enough - at least for now.


Nichole O.

How to Identify What You Need

So now, instead of pushing to get back to normal, I try and take a few minutes at some point during the day to recognize how I’m feeling, acknowledge it and either address it or let it go. Sometimes simply recognizing your feelings is enough - at least for now.