Once you have found your voice and identified what you need, you must verbalize those needs to start to use it.

What that means is different for each person. Maybe, for you, it means speaking up at your next oncology appointment about a symptom you were embarrassed to discuss. Maybe it means pushing back when you feel invalidated or unheard.

While doctors may know about your cancer, you are the expert of your own experience. By sharing your story, you are providing a valuable resource to others in a similar situation. We accept written and video submissions for our blog and Tell Your Story Program.

Your experience during and after treatment is also extremely valuable in the formation of new treatments. Consider lending your voice to patient experience research like The GRYT Project. Not only will you have the opportunity to be heard, but you will be helping to improve quality of life and health outcomes for others.

Discover resources here to navigate what it means to use your voice and how by doing so, you can make a difference for yourself and others.

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Courtney N.

Courtney's Story

GRYT is knowing something is going to be immensely difficult, and facing it with open arms, accepting it into your life so you can better conquer such a difficult task.


Emily P.

The Doctors Told Me I Was Too Young for Cancer

The doctors told me I was too young for cancer and since I don’t have any history of breast cancer in my family the tumor in my breast must just be dense tissue. It took several months to get my breast cancer diagnosis after I had to advocate for myself and insist on a biopsy. At the time of my diagnosis, we knew it was already in my lymph nodes but luckily it hadn’t traveled beyond that.


Ellis E.

Schrödinger's Cancer

The space between tests and diagnosis, where you both have cancer and don't have cancer.


Lauren L.

Lauren Shares Her Story

Meet our Program Coordinator Lauren, she will share her cancer story as well as what she does here at GRYT Health.


Michelle

Michelle and Her "Cancer Card" Moment

Michelle describes a memory from having cancer when she was 11 years old.


Jamie N.

Jamie's Story

GYRT is getting up again and again. Dragging out of that sinking hole you were kicked in and realizing the other people doing the same thing around you


Christian B.

Christian Shares His Story

I didn't know anyone that had cancer.


Nichole O.

Tell Your Story, Nichole


Champaigne

Champaigne

It's definitely been a journey, I had no idea what this cancer world was until I was part of it, and I just want to help anyone that has to go through this.


Patrick M.

Patrick's Story

GRYT is learning to walk again at age 33.


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