In our blog section you will find community submitted content from our GRYT Health community. The entries here are real and raw, and meant to be a resource for you. Whether you are looking for a shared experience or to discover resources you may not have known about, our blog is totally searchable based on what you need. Use the filter selections to the left to customize your search.

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COVID-19 and Cancer: Are Blood Cancer Survivors Facing a Greater Risk?

Coronavirus has stoked my fear of cancer + mortality yet again. It has given me the same sense of dread – that lead, metallic feeling in the middle of your chest – that I had the following hours and days after hearing that I was diagnosed with cancer.


Lacey B.

The Beast is Back, and it Will Eventually Kill Me

Being terminal isn’t for the faint of heart. On August 1, 2017, just weeks before the start of my last year in graduate school, I was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia — an aggressive blood cancer. I was immediately hospitalized for treatment and on November 7, 2017, I received cells from an anonymous donor for an allogeneic stem cell transplant, a hope for a cure.


Rhayne T.

Approach a Breast Cancer Diagnosis with a Sense of Humor!

No, it did not run in my family, no I never drank, used drugs or smoked, no I didn’t eat sugar, yes I took care of my body…yet it showed up anyway. Oh boy. Since I have been telling people for centuries to be informed and NOT live in fear, I was now in a position to walk my talk. And I did. I HAD to!


Justin B.

Depression–A Cancer Survivor’s Story

I’ve alluded to this in past writings, but I fought with clinical depression during high school. However, I’ve never written a full account of this trying time, and in the wake of the unfortunate events with Anthony Bourdain, Kate Spade, and countless others throughout the past decade, I’m ready to take that leap in hopes of letting someone else know to ask for help.


Ellis E

10 Things Worse Than Dying

There are worse things than dying. Like grudges so old that you don’t even remember why you’re angry.


Rachel M.

Stuck

This time last year Was one of the worst times Of my life


Ellis E.

That Was the Plan

Soon I’d have a field of all brightly colored tulips. That was the plan. Anyway.


Rachel M.

What You Grow

You must water what you grow.


Beth R.

Of Course it Wasn’t Cancer, I Was Only 14

Although cancer might be gone, for now, my anxiety and worry have never left. Now I am faced with a new fight, this time, not physically but mentally to live to be my best, share positivity, and appreciate the days I have without cancer.


Sandra Z.

I'm Sorry, But it's Cancer

On February 28th my doctor called me with the dreadful words, “I’m sorry, but it’s cancer.”. My whole life changed. I couldn’t understand how I got this terrible disease. I was 34 years old, with no risk factors. I never smoked, never worked anywhere with radiation or exposed chemicals, I had no family history, and when I got genetic testing done, I tested negative for 34 oncogenes.


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